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I have had these glasses hanging about for a long time.  I picked them up, not knowing their history and have only recently determined that they are French.  I do not know much about this company – only what I learned on Wikipedia:

“Arc International was established in 1825 in the village of Arques in northern France by Alexander des Lyons de Noircarm, who began production by manufacturing glass storage containers known as “dame-jeanne” (demijohns in English), which were popular at that time. In subsequent years, the company diversified into consumer cooking and dining glassware. By the 1960s, the company had mastered the process of manufacturing stemware and other finer glassware products. One of Arc’s signature products is the thick-walled ten-sided “working glasses” that were a workhorse in French kitchens after their introduction in 1978.[4]

From 1897 onwards, the company was dominated by the Durand family, who eventually purchased the firm entirely in 1926. To this day, the family continues to be the sole proprietors. The firm adopted a number of practices that positioned it to become one of Europe’s leading mass production glassmakers. Examples include the usage of tank furnaces (1933), the construction of modern glass presses (1947), the use of automatic blowing machines (1950), the usage of industrial tempering (1963) and the automation of lead crystal production (1968).

Brands

Brands under the Arc International group are to date Luminarc (launched in 1948), Arcoroc (launched in 1963), Cristal d’Arques (launched in Europe in 1968), Chef &S ommelier (launched in 2008) and Arcopal (1958).”

This photo doesn’t truly indicate the size – they are a larger goblet.  I include this photo of the base as I think the geometric detailing is pretty.

 

 

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